LONGLEAF STORIES

full circle in the hundred acre wood

In hopes of getting ahead of the steamy heat, I head out for the woods shortly after 7 this morning.

Too late. I am grateful for the wide-brimmed sun-protection hat with its UPF50+ rating to block most UV rays, (thanks Adele, Richard, Andie, Alex & Julia!), but that doesn’t keep me from sweating  glistening. (I read recently that horses sweat, but ladies “glisten.”)  I’m quite sure, however, that the quantity of perspiration rolling down my face and neck is beyond any contemplation of glistening. It is sweat, thick and copious. 

 

These wildflowers with their sturdy beauty don’t need cosmetic touch-ups to be photo ready.

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I put my camera into one of the slots of my zippered fanny pack and pick up the pace.  After another mile or so, just as I am approaching my turn-around spot, I see some kind of large animal pouncing, cat-like, on something hidden in the tall dry wheat stalks of the food plot we call “Number 5.”

I fumble for my camera and manage to take a quick picture before the animal senses my presence, whirls in the fluid power of undomesticated mammals, and disappears into the bordering swamp.

I move briskly homeward. My walk turns aerobic. My logical mind knows this animal would not follow me. Every few minutes I look over my shoulder. . . just to be sure.

Coyote 6-26-09

 Now that I have downloaded the photo, it almost looks like a house cat. A 30 to 40 pound house cat. Maybe a fox?  The ears are large and sharp, and the tail got brushier when it saw me.  Not a Florida panther. Not a bobcat. Not a coyote. I think I see a large, grey fox face through the grass . What do you think?

 

0 thoughts on “Bucolic Morning Stroll Turns Aerobic

  1. Shaddy says:

    I don’t know what to think about the animal you photographed. The big ears do make me lean toward your thoughts of a fox. Will we ever know for sure?
    I appreciate the wildflower photos and your early morning walk. I tried to avoid the heat here this morning as well with an early run and bike ride. There’s no way I can say I was glistening; I was sweating rivulets. I’m reminding myself again and again that it’s a “small” price to pay for health and fitness.

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  2. Gullible says:

    Certainly does look fox-like, but Wiki says gray fox are in the 8 to 15 lb. range. Ocelots are spotted. Ya got me. I’m stumped over what kind of bear I saw last night. Couldn’t get the scope on him fast enough to see if it was a black or brown bear. Usually, the dense blackness of black bear’s coats tell me right away, but some very dark brown bears hang out on the mountain right behind me. Have to see the muzzle to tell for sure.

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  3. David Bailey says:

    http://www.unexplainedresearch.com/in_the_news/north_carolina_mystery_creature2.html
    will take you to a picture of a mystery critter seen in NC. they never figured out what it was, but had a lot of fun trying:
    Pell’s husband, Steve Pell, took her picture to Montgomery Tech where he studies taxidermy. “They didn’t know what it was,” she said.
    Neither do the guys at Bennie Needham’s barber shop. Needham said one of the most plausible possibilities came from Charles Langley, a customer who showed the picture to people in South Carolina. “They told him it was a ‘coydog,’ a cross between a coyote and a dog. They said they’ve got ’em down there.”
    Pell said she didn’t know what the creature she saw could be, but that “he had a cute little gait.” Wouldn’t it be wonderful, she said, if he and Kurdian’s creature had puppies and they trotted into the lens of his camera some night?
    Kurdian grinned. “Now that would make a great picture.”

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  4. I don’t know, but from what I read you’d better watch out for Burmese pythons, which evidently have made it past Tallahassee and are coming for me in Ohio . . .

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